What to do if you can’t orgasm – and how to have better sex every single time

A female orgasm might seem like it’s easy but sadly a lot of women struggle to reach the big-O.

In fact, it’s a thing and those who struggle to climax are likely to have anorgasmia or Coughlan’s Syndrome.

This affects between 5-10% of women and a smaller percentage of men, but it’s unclear what actually causes it.

So what can you do if you can’t reach orgasm and your relationship is suffering as a result?

While everyone’s different, there are ways to help to increase the chances of experiencing an orgasm.

Luckily, anorgasmia can be cured but sometimes it isn’t a quick or easy fix.



The inability to orgasm is called anorgasmia or Coughlan’s Syndrome

The causes can be physical, emotional or psychological – or even a combination of all three, meaning that treatment varies.

Stephanie Taylor, managing director, at Kegal8, has given some tips to help increase the chances of pleasure.

If you’re entering the menopause or are post-menopausal, oestrogen therapy can be offered to boost your sexual morale.

This comes in a form of a pill, patch of gel which eases menopausal side effects such as vaginal atrophy, loss of libido.



Couple kissing on the bed
You can learn what you like during sex or masturbation

But if you can’t regain control, the best place to start if you think you’re suffering from anorgasmia is to experiment.

Get to know your body and how you feel when you’re intimate with yourself or your other half.

Just remember that everyone is stimulated by different things and when you know what you enjoy, you’re more likely to reach an orgasm.

Take it slow and only ever do things you feel comfortable with trying and be as open as possible with your partner.

Remember, most women need either direct or indirect clitoral stimulation to climax, so focus your attention on this.

If this holistic approach fails you, it might be time to seek help from either your GP, a sex therapist or relationship counsellor.

The first step is making an appointment and write a list of your symptoms, sexual history, conditions and medication before you go.

Don’t be put off by embarrassment as you’re not the first and last to experience anorgasmia.

Source: dailystar.co.uk

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